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Denton’s Vintage Jazz Society presents music historian

March 16, 2012

John Cowles is a collector of original ragtime sheet music and currently has over 900 authentic rag pieces from the early 1900’s in his collection. He still writes and sings, but as there are few deadlines, ‘this activity is much more enjoyable than it was in the 1960’s.”

  • Monday, March 19, 9:30 a.m.,  the Vintage Jazz Society will meet at the Center for Visual Arts, 400 East Hickory Street in Denton,  to enjoy another music-laden program by music historian (and wind-up record player collector) John Cowles.

“The program I am working on for Monday, is titled “Trumpet Blues – A Survey of Hot Blues Singers with Trumpet accompaniment from the 1920s and 1930s,” Cowles said.

“The inspiration came from a discussion I had with trumpeter John Weir, whose favorite kind of music is the Blues. I asked him if he had ever heard the Blues trumpet music from the 1920’s and 30’s. He had not.”

  • Click here for an example for Blues Trumpeter Oran Thaddeus: PtUfwxq2868

Cowles has offered five previous Jazz music history programs during VJS bi-monthly meetings at the Center for Visual Arts, 400 East Hickory Street in Denton, 9:30 a.m.

1. Musical Interconnections, or The Story of Ragtime into Jazz (part 1) – A brief overview of the beginnings of tin-pan- alley and the genesis of jazz

2. The Story of Ragtime into Jazz (part 2)

3. A Survey of Popular Music in the USA in the Year 1924 (this was dedicated to VJS member Jim Staercke, who was born in 1924)

4. Fun Recordings – 10 Vintage Jazz Sessions that are Fun or Unique

5. The Dixieland Jazz Revival of the 1940s and 1950s

English: "I Got The Blues" (sheet mu...

Image via Wikipedia

More about John Cowles
From Swedish Ragtime Home Page
http://www.ragtime.nu/

John Cowles was born on June 11, 1944, in North Carolina and spent most of his childhood in the Allegany Mountains of West Virginia and Western Maryland. John’s discovery of banjo ragtime on old cylinder recordings in the 1950’s was the beginning of a lifetime interest in ragtime. After a vague career as an underfed writer and wandering folksinger in the 1960’s, Cowles discovered that a computer career was not only more rewarding, but didn’t have publisher’s deadlines or drunken audiences. Since 1969 he has worked in the high-end technical computation field, most recently with Hewlett-Packard.

Although Cowles currently lives in Texas, most of his life since 1982 has been spent in Japan. In 1987 John began the study of piano to augment his work on guitar and banjo. Because he is by no means a stellar player, he began writing his own midi sequencing programs to ‘help out’ with his deficient technique and has managed to preserve more than one hundred rags in this way. Cowles is a collector of original ragtime sheet music and currently has over 900 authentic rag pieces from the early 1900’s in his collection. He still writes and sings, but as there are few deadlines, this activity is much more enjoyable than it was in the 1960’s.

Cowles’ hobbies include banjo – he has been a member of the American Banjo Fraternity for forty years – history of recorded popular music, and medieval Latin and French poetry. He delivered a radio program on this subject in China at the request of the Chinese government in 1996.

When he is not playing ragtime, he can often be found at a local pub, playing Cape Breton fiddle music and singing the Scottish folksongs he learned from his mother.

 

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One Comment
  1. Your style is really unique in comparison to
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